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New Horizons

The mission

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New Horizons is a NASA mission.

New Horizons is designed to help us understand worlds at the edge of our solar system by making the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission would then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune.

New Horizons launched Jan. 19 2006. It passed Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February 2007, and will reach Pluto and its moons in July 2015. Then, as part of an extended mission, the spacecraft would head deeper into the Kuiper Belt to study one or more of the icy mini-worlds in that vast region, at least a billion miles beyond Neptune's orbit. Sending a spacecraft on this long journey will help us answer basic questions about the surface properties, geology, interior makeup and atmospheres on these bodies.


News

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New Horizons closest approach to Pluto on 14 July. NASA's mission page

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Interviw with Josep Manel Carrasco in the "Notķcies de les 10 de BTV" about Pluto and New Horizons, 16 de July 2015
New Horizons reached Pluto after a nine- year journey through the Solar System. Josep Manel Carrasco, astronomer of the Department of Astronomy and Meteorology of the UB talk about Pluto

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From Mountains to Moons: Multiple Discoveries from NASA’s New Horizons Pluto Mission, 16 July 2015
Icy mountains on Pluto and a new, crisp view of its largest moon, Charon, are among the several discoveries announced Wednesday by NASA's New Horizons team, just one day after the spacecraft’s first ever Pluto flyby.

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Pluto and Charon: New Horizons’ Dynamic Duo, 9 July 2015
They’re a fascinating pair: Two icy worlds, spinning around their common center of gravity like a pair of figure skaters clasping hands. Scientists believe they were shaped by a cosmic collision billions of years ago, and yet, in many ways, they seem more like strangers than siblings.

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New Horizons Update: Methane Detected; New Images of Pluto and Charon; Sunrise/Sunset Observations, 1 July 2015
Yes, there is methane on Pluto, and, no, it doesn’t come from cows. The infrared spectrometer on NASA’s Pluto-bound New Horizons spacecraft has detected frozen methane on Pluto’s surface; Earth-based astronomers first observed the chemical compound on Pluto in 1976.

mąxim NASA’s New Horizons Detects Surface Features, Possible Polar Cap on Pluto, 30 April
For the first time, images from NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft are revealing bright and dark regions on the surface of faraway Pluto – the primary target of the New Horizons close flyby in mid-July.

mąxim NASA host briefings on historic mission to Pluto,
NASA Television will air media briefings at 1 p.m. EDT and 2:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 14, to discuss plans and related upcoming activities about the agency’s historic New Horizons spacecraft flyby of Pluto this summer.
Briefers will describe the mission’s goals, scientific objectives and encounter plans, including the types of images and other data that can be expected and when.

mąxim NASA Extends Campaign for Public to Name Features on Pluto The public has until Friday, April 24 to help name new features on Pluto and its orbiting satellites as they are discovered by NASA’s New Horizons mission.

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New Horizons wakes up on Pluto's doorstep, 7 December,
After a voyage of nearly nine years and three billion miles —the farthest any space mission has ever traveled to reach its primary target – NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft came out of hibernation on Dec. 6th for its long-awaited 2015 encounter with the Pluto system.

mąxim NASA’s Hubble Telescope Finds Potential Kuiper Belt Targets for New Horizons Pluto Mission, 15 October,
This is an artist’s impression of a Kuiper Belt object (KBO), located on the outer rim of our solar system at a staggering distance of 4 billion miles from the Sun. A HST survey uncovered three KBOs that are potentially reachable by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft after it passes by Pluto in mid-2015
 
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