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Revision 408 Feb 2017 - SurinyeOlarte

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Frequently Asked Questions About Lunar Eclipses

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  1_ What is really important is that the Moon should be over the horintzont. Moon eclipses can only happen with Full Moon, then to say that should be night or that the Moon should be ober the horizont is equivalent. Full Moon always rise with the sunset.

When were the past Moon eclipses visible from Spain?

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  • 28 September 2015: Total eclipse visible in all phases. Live-Broadcasted by ServiAstro. Check the images.
  • 15 June 2011: Total eclipse. The Moon rose completely eclipsed.
  • 21 December 2010 : Total eclipse visible from Spain up to the beginning of the totality.
  • 31 December 2009 : Partial eclipse.
  • 6 August 2009 : Penombral eclipse enterely observable.
  • 16 August 2008 : Partial eclipse, almost visible from the beginning.
  • 21 February 2008: Total eclipse, enterely visible. Live-Broadcasted by ServiAstro. Check the images.
  • 3 March 2007 : Total eclipse, enterely visible. Live-Broadcasted by ServiAstro. Check the images.
 
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When will next eclipses take place?

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What are the Saros series?

The periodicity and recurrence of eclipses is governed by the saros cycle, a period of approximately 6,585.3 days (18 years 11 days 8 hours) separates two very similar eclipses. It was known to the Chaldeans as a period when lunar eclipses seem to repeat themselves, but the cycle is applicable to solar eclipses as well. Not all eclipses within the same series are very similar. Only two consecutive eclipses resemble each other. The eclipses within one series begin as penumbral eclipses, later they become partial eclipses, then total eclipses, then partial eclipses again and finally penumbral eclipses. After the last penumbral eclipse, the series concludes. The whole proces can last for over 1500 years.

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What are the ascending and descending nodes?

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Earth's orbit around the Sun and Moon's orbit around the Earth are not in the same plane, but Moon's orbit is slightly inclined : around 5º.
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Earth's orbit around the Sun and Moon's orbit around the Earth are not in the same plane, but http://www.hermit.org/Eclipse/why_months.html#Draconic": around 5º.
  Lunar nodes (Moon's orbit nodes) are the points in the ecliptic plane (where Earth and Sun are located) where the orbit of the Moon crosses it. The ascending node is where the Moon crosses to the North of the l'ecliptic. The descending node is where it crosses to the South of the ecliptic.
 
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